winerock.com

 About Me

 
Publications

 
Writings & Research

 
Teaching & Performing

 
Early Dance Texts

 
Shakespearean Dance
 Resource Guide

 Renaissance Dance Links

 Bernard the Bear
Home > Early Dance Texts > The Art of Jugling or Legerdemaine

Search winerock.com

Loading

The Art of Jugling or Legerdemaine

-- My transcription of dance-relevant passages from the British Library's copy of Samuel Rid's The Art of Jugling or Legerdemaine. Facsimilie reprint. (Amsterdam, Norwood, NJ: Walter J. Johnson, Inc.; Theatrum Orbis Terrarum, Ltd., 1974) STC: 21027.

-- As concessions to Dreamweaver and web compatibility, double spaces between sentences have been reduced to single spaces, certain irregularities of spacing and punctuation for margin justification have been regularised, and the ∫/s is modernised except in titles. The ' ------ ' denotes page breaks. Obviously this does not replicate the look or type face of the original... but I've done my best! --E. F. Winerock

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Art of Iugling or
Legerdemaine.

Wherein is deciphered, all the
conueyances of Legerdemaine and Iug-
ling, how they are effected, & wher-
in they chiefly consist.

Cautions to beware of cheating
at Cardes and Dice.

The detection of the beggerly Art
of Alcumistry.
&,
The foppery of foolish cousoning Charmes.

All tending to mirth and recreation, especially
for those that desire to haue the insight and
priuate practise thereof.

By S. R.

2uod nonatesta capit, Inueterata sapit.
_____________-______________________________
Printed at London for T.B. and are to be
solde by Samuel Rand, neere
Holborne-bridge. 1612.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

To make one daunce naked.

IT hath bene reported of such fellowes, and such, that they can doe rare feates, as to make one daunce naked. To the effecting of this, make a poore boy confederate with you,: so as after charmes and words spoken by you, he uvnclothe himselfe and stand naked : seeming *whilst he vndresseth him) to shake, stampe, and c[r?]ie, still hastening to be vnclothed, till he be starke naked : or if you can procure none to goe so farre, let him onely begin to stamp and shake &c. and to vnclothe him, and then you may (for reuerence of the company) seeme to release him.

Top 



Home
Copyright 1999-2015 E. F. Winerock
Updated 10 March, 2015