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The Third Universitie of England

-- My transcription from the NYPL Mid-Manhattan Research Library's copy of selected dance-relevant passages of Sir George Buck's The Third Universitie of England, an appendix to the 1615 edition of John Stow's The Annales, Or Generall Chronicle of England finished and edited by Edmond Howes. London: Thomas Adams, 1615, as well as a few passages from the main Annales text. The 1631 edition as viewed at the British Library also contains The Third Universitie of England, but while the main text differs, the 'Orchestice' and other Third Universitie passages are the same.

-- As concessions to Dreamweaver and web compatibility, double spaces between sentences have been reduced to single spaces, certain irregularities of spacing and punctuation for margin justification have been regularised, and the ∫/s is modernised except in titles. The ' ------ ' denotes page breaks. Obviously this does not replicate the look or type face of the original... but I've done my best! --E. F. Winerock

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AN
A P P E N D I X
OR
COROLLARY OF THE
FOVNDATIONS AND
DISCRIPTIONS OF THE
THREE MOST FAMOVS
VNIVERSITIES OF
ENGLANDE,

VIZ.
CAMBRIDGE, OXFORD, and LONDON,

THE MATTERS WHERE
OF CONCERNING THE
FORMER TWO VNIVERSITIES
WERE GATHERED BY THAT
Indutrious, and much reading Choronit, Ma-
ter Iohn Stow,
Cittizen of London, and ∫uppli-
ed, and continued by Edmond Howes,
of London Gentleman.

THE THIRDE WAS
Collected and Written by Syr GEORGE
BVCK k
night, one of the Gentlemen
of the KINGES Priuie Chamber, and
Ma
ter of his Maieties Office
of the REVELLS.

<floral design>

ANNO DOMINI, 1615.

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AN
ADVERTISEMENT

to the Reader, concerning

the three Vniuer∫ities of Englande.

 

 

I
 

T is not vnknowne to any that haue read the Chronicles, or
Annales of this Kingdome, especially written by that aunci-
ent Industrious antiquarie Master Iohn Stow, that hee was ac-
customed to ioyne to his Historicall worke, the foundations, and discriptions of all the colledges, and houses of learning,
erected within the most famous vniuersities of Cambridg and
Oxford: since whose death, I hauing done my true endeauor
for the augumentation, and continuation of our generall En-
glish Chronicle, have thought it fit for worthy memory: not

only to set downe his relation of the said vniuersities, and also all the supplement, and
encrease of other new colledges in those two vniuersities since his death: but also to ad
thereunto a treatise of the third Vniuersitie of England, to wit London, which treatise
was lately gathered, & written by S. GEORGE BVCK Knight, Gentleman of the kings
priuy Chamber, and Master of his Maiesties office of the Revells, and by him giuen
and dedicated, to the right honorable Sir EDWARD COKE Knight, Lord chiefe Iu-
stice of England, and one of his Maiesties priuie Counsell, to be disposed at his Lord-
shippes pleasure, whereof I hauing aduertisement, became an humble sutor to his lord
shippe, that I might haue it to publish with the rest, whereunto his Lordshippe very
fauourably condescended, and forthwith deliuered it vnto mee, with speciall com-
mendation, and approbation, as of a worke worthy the publique Light, and to that

purpose gaue his honourable allowance vnder his owne hand. The publication
whereof accordingly, I haue with all diligence performed not doubting but
that the Ingenious Reader will kindely accept thereof, and of their
Loue and paynes by whome it is friendly, and
freely imparted vnto them.

Your euer wellwiller,
EDMOND HOWES

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THE
THIRD VNIVERSI-
TIE OF ENG-
LAND.
OR
A TREATISE OF THE
FOVNDATIONS OF
ALL THE COLLEDGES, AVN-
CIENT SCHOOLES OF
PRIVILEDGE, AND OF
HOVSES OF LEAR-
NING, AND LIBE-
RALL ARTS,
WITHIN AND
ABOUT THE
MOST FAMOVS
CITTIE OF
LONDON.

WITH A BRIEFE REPORT OF THE SCIEN-
CES, ARTS, AND FACVLTIES THEREIN

PROFESSED, STVDIED, AND
PRACTISED.

Together with the Blazon of the Armes, and En-
ignes thereunto belonging.

Gathered faithfully out of the bet Hitories, Chronicles,
Records, and Archiues, by G. B. Knight.

<floral design>

ANNO DOMINI, 1615.

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To the right Honorable, and
the most reuerend, and mo∫t learned Iudge, Syr
Edward Coke
knight, Lord chiefe Iu-
tice of England, of pleas before the KING
himelfe to be holden, and
one of his Maieties pri-
uie Councell.

 

MY VERY HONORABLE GOOD LORD,

 

I
 

Present here to your Lordship, a view of the
Academicall State, and of the Vuniuersalitie of
the Studies, and of the liberall Arts, and lear-
nings taught, and professed in this Cittie of
London : And vnto your Lordshippe rather
then to any other, for these causes. First, be-
cause you are not onely generally well lear-

ned, but also an excellent Antiquary, that is, one that can best iudge,
and is much delighted with these kind of Studies. Secondly, in re-
spect that your Lordship is an especiall louer of this Cittie, and very
studious by all meanes to aduance the flourishing state thereof.
Thirdly, in regard that the greatest part of this Booke is bestowed
in the description of the Colledges, and collegiate houses founded
in this Cittie, for the professors of the Municipall, or common Law
of this Land : Whereof your Lordship is not onely a most learned
professor, but also a singular Antecessor, a chiefe Iudge,and a princi-pall interpreter. My last, and not my least reason is grounded vpon
the due consideration of the many fauous, which I haue recei-
ued of your Lordship, and for the which I holde my selfe, excee-
dingly bound to your Lordship : and albeit I doe not (in com-
plementing manner) make daily profession of this my obligation
(as many use to doe) yet there is no man shall bee more readie to
doe to your Lordshippe any honour, or seruice, then my poore
selfe, when, and so often as occasion shall bee presented : and in
the meane time, and for a gage, and arrhes thereof I giue and de-
dicate vnto your Lordship, this T H I R D  V N I V E R S I T I E,
vnto the which I pray your Lordship to giue fauourable enter-
tainement, or if in your Iustice you thinke it not worthy, I sub-
mit it to your Lordshippes censure or sentence, eyther of life, or
death, presse or suppression. And so I humbly take my leaue,
from his Maiesties office of the Reuels, vppon Saynt Peters hill.
24. of August 1612.

Your Lorships very much oblieged,
readie to doe you seruice,    

George Buc.

M m m m   

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<decorative pic>

A
CATALOGVE
OR TABLE OF ALL
THE ARTS, AND
SCIENCES READ, AND
TAVGHT IN THIS
VNIVERSITIE OF
LONDON.

T
Heologie
Grammar
Rhetorike
Geographie
Nauigation
Languages
Poetry
Arithmetike
Logike
Philo
∫ophie
Municipall, or common Law
Law of Con
∫cience
Ciuill Law

Cannon Law
Phi
ike
Chirurgery
A
tronomy
Geometry
Mu
ike
Mathematikes
Hydrographie
Co∫mographie
Calligraphie
Brachygraphie
Steganographie
Art Gladiatorie
Hippice, or the art of Riding
Polemice, or art Millitary
Pyrotechnie
Artellerie
Art of
wimming
Orche
tice, or art of Dancing
Graphice, or the art of Paynting
Heraldica
Art of Reuels
Art Memoratiue,
And others.

<decorative pic >

M m m m 2

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984

Of Poets and of Mu∫itians.

Cap, 38.

 

H
Ere be also in this Cittie Poets,
excelling in all kinde of Poesie ( to
wit ) Dramatike, Lirike, Heroi-
call, or Epick, Poemenicall, or
Pastorall, Sotadik, & Satyricall. That first
and most auncient kind of Poesy the Drama-
tik, is so liuely expressed and represented vpon
the publike stages & Theaters of this citty,
as Rome in the Auge of her pompe & glorie,
neuer saw it better performed, ( I meane in
respect of the action, and art, and not of the
cost, and sumptuousnesse ) for therein the Ro-
maynes exceeded all the nations of the world.
Of this art haue written largely, Petrus Vic-
torius, Petrus Crinitus, Cælius Rodyginus, Car-
lo Gatto, Ludouico Dulce, Georgius Fabritius,
Iulius Cæsar Scaligor
, and who hath written
so much and so well ( and being an author in
all good Poets handes ) as it were in vaine
for me to say any thing of the art, besides that
I haue written thereof, a particular Trea-
tise.
  Here bee also the best Musitians of this
kingdome, and equall to any in Europe for
their skill eyther in composing, and setting, or
in singing, or for playing vpon any kinde of
Musicall Instruments. The Musitians haue
obtayned of the King our Soueraygne Lord,
Letters pattents for a Society and corpora-
tion.
  And for their Armes they beare Azure a
Swan Argent, within a tressure Countre-
floure Or. and in a cheefe Gules, a Rose be-
tweene two Lyons Or. and for their crest the
signe called by the Astronomers Fidicula, or
the Orphæan Lyre.

 

Of other arts & ∫ciences ingenu-
ous, and liberall, professed in this Cittie,
and in fewe other Vniuer
ities.

Cap, 40.

 

N
Owe that I haue run ouer
the Liberall arts and other
scholler-like & Academicall
studies, I will speake some-
thing of other Arts, which
although they be not profes-

sed in euery other Vniuersitie, nor reckoned
amongst the auncient liberall Arts & Scien-
ces, yet in respect that they are fit for a gentle-
man ( whom none doe become but honorable
and liberall and ingenuous Arts ) and other
arts shall haue no place in this discourse. In
the choise of the arts of this kinde, I will not
be mine owne Caruer, but will receiue them
of the recommendation and warrant of that
most learned and iudicious noble Gentleman
the Counte Baldesser Castilio, who recoun-
ting the qualities and arts necessary and properly apperteyning to a Gentleman (and so
consequently to be esteemed liberall and in-
genuous ) giueth to the arts Gladiatorie or of defence, and of Riding, and of Paynting, and
of Pourtraying, and of Dancing, place a-
mongst them : And these all being professed
and taught in this Cittie, and that by excel-
lent Maisters, I thinke I should wrong this
Academy, and the professors and learners of
these arts herein if I should not mention and
record them in this register or treatise, I will
first begin with that art of Ryding (which the
Græcians called Hippice ) as the most wor-
thy of them, and is a principall part or mem-
ber of Polemica or art of Military.


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986

Of Orche∫tice, or the Art of
Dancing.

Cap, 44.

 

T
He art of Dancing called by the
auncient Grecians, Orchestice, &
Orchestis (although Tully in his
austeritie, and out of his spleene

towards M. Anthony, seeing him dance, said,
(Nemo saltat sobrius) is notwithstanding an
art and qualitie, not iustly obnoxious to that
his bitter imputation: but contrarywise com-
mendable, and fit for a Gentleman, being op-
portunely and modestly used. And Plato
that most graue Philosopher thinketh meete
that ingenuous children be taught to Dance:
And it is not onely allowed and graced in the
Courts of Princes, and in the best and most
honorable Citties, and euen in the colledges
of the reuerend and graue Professors of our
Lawes, but also hath so good approbation in
the holy Scriptures, as we find that Micholl
was much blamed for laughing at King Da-
vid when he danced. Of this art many bookes
haue been written, as that Pamflet in the
Macaronicall tongue, intituled Liber bragar-
dissimus de danzis
, and diuers other the like.
And much more aunciently it hath bin han-
dled by Athenæs and Iulius Pollux, & since
by Cælius Rodigynus, and lastly and largely
enough by Thomas Garzoni in his Piazza Vni-
uersale in discorso
45. de Ballarini. Under this
art, Valting and tumbling, and going uppon
ropes, and the doing Feats of actiuitie, & rare
agilittie are comprehended: and in these arts of

dancing and valting we haue countrymen of
our owne, which be very excellent, as M. Car-
dell, groome of the Queenes priuie chamber,
and M. Warren, and M. Roland, the Kinges
Musitians, and M. Iohn Hasset, and diuers
others.
  I set not downe the armes of the professors
of dancing, because I haue not seene them:
besides I am enformed that they are of ye So-
ciety of the musitians, which I easily beleeue,
for dancing cannot stand without Musicke,
and then are they furnished, hauing an equall
and common interest, as well in the ensignes
as in the Societie and corporation.


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988

Of the Art of Reuels.

Cap 47.

 

I
Might hereunto adde for a Co-
rollary of this discourse, the Art
of Reuels, which requireth know-
ledge in Grammar, Rhetorike,
Logicke, Philosophie, Historie, Musick, Ma-
thamatikes, & in other Arts ( & all more then

I understand I confesse ) & hath a setled place
within this Cittie. But because I haue dis-
cribed it, and discoursed thereof at large in a
particular commentarie, according to my ta
lent, I will surcease to speake any more ther-
or : blazing onely the armes belonging to it,
which are Gules a crosse Argent, and in the
first corner of the scutcheon, a Mercuries Pe-
tasus Argent, and a Lyon Gules in cheefe
Or.

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-- From the main text of Stow's Annales, in the chapter 'King Iames.'

916

  And that night in honor of this ioyfull nupti-
all, there was a very stately Maske of Lords &
Ladies, wt many ingenious speeches, delicate
deuises, melodious musique, pleasant daunces,
with other princely entertainements of tyme,
all which were singularly well performed in
the Banquetting house. The 4. honorable
Innes of Court, aswell the elders and graue
Benchers of each house, as the towardly yoong
active gallant Gentelmen of the same houses,
being of infinte desire to expresse their singu-
lar loue and duteous affection to his maiestie,
and to performe some memorable & acceptable

H h h h 2                   seruice

 

A Maske of
Lord and
Ladies.

 


The seuerall
maskes of the
Innes of Court

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917

seruice worthy their own reputation, in honor
of this nuptiall, & therupon
wt great exrpedition
they ioyntly & severally consulted, and agreed
amongst themselues to sette out two seuerall
rich and stately masks, and to performe them
brauel, without respect of charge or expences,
and from amongst themselues they selected the
most pregnant & actiue Gentlemen to bee their
maskers, who to the lasting honor of them-
selues and their societies performed all things
as worthily : they imployed the best wits and
skilfullest artizens in deuising, composing, and
creating their seuerall strange properties, ex-
cellent speeches, pleasant deuises, and delicate
musique, braue in habite, rych in ornaments,
in demeanor courtly, in their going by Land
and Water very stately and orderly : all which
with their rare inuentions and variable enter-
tainments of time were such, as the like was
neuer performed in England by any Societie,
and was now as gratiously accepted off by his
Maiestie, the Queene, the Prince, the Bride
and Bridegroome. From whom they receiued
all princely thankes and encouragement : con-
cerning which two maskes, with the multi-
plicitie of deuises, depending vpon those enter-
tainements of time, though I may not sette
downe the particulars, nor say all I ought in
their deseruing commendations, by reason it
would require a verie large discourse : yet for
distination sake, I will briefly set downe their
seuerall times and order of going to the court.
Vpon Shroue-mundaie at night, the gentleme[n]
of the middle Temple & Lincolnes Inne, with
their Trayne for this businesse, assembled in
Chancery-lane, at the house of Sir Edward
Philips, maister of the Roles, and about eyght
of the cloake, they marched thence through the
Strand, to the court at White hall, in this
manner. First rode fiftie choyce Gentlemen
richly attyred, and as gallantly mounted, with
euery one his footemen to attend him : these
rode very stately like a vauntguard : next after
with fit distance, marched an antique, or mock-
maske of Baboons, attired like fantastique
trauaillers, in very strange and confused man-
ner, ryding vppon Asses, or dwarfe Jades, v-
sing all apeish and mocking trickes to the peo-
ple, mouing much laughter as they past, with
Torches on either side to shew their state to be
as ridiculous, as the rest was noble : After
them came two chariots triumphal, very plea-
sant and full of state, wherein rode the choyce
Musitians of this Kingdome, in robes like to
the Virginian priests, with sundry deuises, all
pleasant and significant, with two rankes of
Torches : Then came the chiefe maskers with
great state in white Indian habit, or like the
great princes of Barbary, richly imbrodred wt
the golden sun, with suteable ornaments in all
poynts, about their neckes were rufs of Fea-
thers, spangled and beset with pearle & siluer,
and vpon their heads loftie corronets suteable
to the rest : they wore long silk Stockings, va-
riously imbrodred with gold to ye
midleg : their
buskins were likewise imbrodred, and in their hands as they rode, they bra[n]dished Cane darts

917

of the finest gold : their vizards were of Olius
collour, their haire long & black downe to their
shoulders : the horses for rich shew equalled the
Maskers : their caparisons were enchast with
suns of golde & ornamentall Jewels, with sil-
ver, scarffing ouer the whole caparison, & about
their heads, which made such a strange & glo-
rious show, that it dazelled the eyes of the beholders with great admiration : euery of these
horse had 2. Moores to attend them, attired like
Indian slaues with wreathes of gold and wat-
shed about their heads, being about an hun-
dreth in number : the Torch-bearers carryed
Torches of virgin waxe, the slaues whereof
were great Canes guilded all ouer, and their
habits were likewise of the Indian Garb, but
more extrauagant then those of ye
maskers, the
maskers rode single & had euery man his torch-
bearer ryding before him. All which with the
last triumphall Chariot, wherein sate manie
strange attired persenages, with their emble-
ams, conceitfull and variable deuises, made a
wondrous pleassing shew. And thus they mar-
ched through the Strand to Whitehall, where
the King, the Prince, the bride & Bridegroome, and the chiefe nobilitie stoode in the gallery be-
fore the Tilt-yard to behold their approch, and
because there should be a full view had of their
state & traine, the King caused them to march
one turne about the list, and being dismounted
they were honorably attended through ye galle-
ry to a chamber, in which they were to make
them ready for performance of their Scene in
the hall, in which place, were erected their sun-
dry properties, & deuises, formerly mentioned,
where they performed all things answerable to
the best of expectation, and receiued as royall
thankes and commendations.

 

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